De donde  salen estas Indias?
Siempre con sus caras bien sufridas
Viven y mueren en las cuevas de el canyon del cobre.
Nosotros los turistas llegamos con mucho animo de ver el Paisaje de Chihuahua,
  sentados en El Chepe,
 el tren pasajero.

As I exited the Copper Canyon El Chepe train,
 school aged children vendors
 clad in bright, cherry, red skirts,
 royal blue dresses and
 daisy yellow floral blouses,
raced to greet American tourists
 with their wares.
 They sell homemade
 beaded bracelets,
 stone rings
 and fringed rebozos.

De donde salen estas Indias?
Siempre con sus caras bien sufridas
Viven y mueren en las cuevas de el canyon del cobre.
Nosotros los turistas llegamo con mucho animo de ver el Paisaje de Chihuahua,
 sentados en El Chepe,
 el tren pasajero.


The women clad in handmade clothes always busy sewing,
 one stitch at a time.
 Their calloused feet whisper
 untold stories of suffering, and defeat.
 Tarahumaras construct huaraches
 out of old tires, discarded leather scraps,
and rarely wear them out.
 They weave intricate baskets
 like spiders designing their web—
 braiding and weaving tall dried grass which they gather
from the side of the mountain.

De donde salen estas Indias?
Siempre con sus caras bien  sufridas
Viven y mueren en las cuevas de el canyon del cobre
Nosotros los turistas llegamos con mucho animo de ver el
Paisaje de Chihuahua,
  sentados en El Chepe,
 el tren pasajero.

They don’t speak Spanish
 as one would expect;
 they speak their own Raramuri dialect
 to communicate with one another.
 They sit on the ancient, grey, dusty stones
 with scarves protecting their heads and faces from the unrelenting, pounding sun. I never viewed the Tarahumara women vendors eating in the entire day! These women and children are slaves in their homes, slaves to their work and they seem content with what they have—they survive with almost nothing to call their own.
Dr. Melba Salazar-Lucio is a full time professor at Texas Southmost College where she teaches writing and literature. After teaching 35 years of high school English, she is elated with her new life teaching at TSC. She has been married to the love of her life, Juan David for 38 years. Sher has 3 adult children: Monica Leah, David Daniel and Erika Teresa. Her favorite time of the year is when she gets to see her grandbabies: BellaVida, Charlotte Mae and Phoenix.
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