Estado yo en el movimiento Chicano
Y yo recuerdo el poder de tus manos
Estado yo contemplando y te extraño
Solo al pensar del movimiento Chicano

Recuerdo que tú me ensenaste quien era
Dentro la historia de mi raza en la tierra
Yo sé quién soy dentro la causa en el Valle
Mi identidad es Chicano lo sabes

La juventud no sabe de tus hechos
Cuando el Chicano peleo por sus derechos
La gente no sabe de tu historia Chicano 
La causa en Valle que recuerdo y extraño

Nunca me olvidare de ti
Del movimiento Chicano fui
Tú me ensenaste mi identidad
Dentro la causa y la sociedad

Chicano estoy consiente
Dentro de este sol ardiente
Que en El Valle ya ni se miente
La causa de nuestra gente

Nunca me olvidare de ti
Del movimiento Chicano fui
Nunca me olvidare de ti
Del movimiento Chicano fui

Nunca me olvidare de ti
Del movimiento Chicano fui
Tú me ensenaste mi identidad
Dentro la causa y la sociedad  
(1) “La Estacion Del Soldado, (Tribute to Brown Berets)” and (2) “Recuerdo el Movimiento En El Valle” is derived from research this Faculty/Author has conducted on Chicano Activism in the Rio Grande Valley (El Valle). Its onset during 2004, the research focuses on documenting the activities generated by Chicano activists in the RGV, with emphasis in identifying community organizing models and theoretical perspectives, including strategies and tactics, utilized by Chicano activists during the Chicano Movement of the late 1960s-mid-1970s.
This research, which is supported with video-taped interviews of Chicano activists and persons who witnessed the Movement in El Valle, has led to publication of an article, numerous presentations on Chicano activism and community organizing, and composition of songs and music with the purpose of promoting Mexican-American cultural awareness. The two songs submitted to the Chachalaca Review, can be treated as poetry in classroom instruction to engage students in critical thinking about the Chicano Movement and community organizing, an activity much needed and justified in the Rio Grande Valley in view of conditions characterizing this area. The songs reflect on sources of activism generated by Chicano activists; they can be associated with instructional content on conditions that justified the Chicano Movement in El Valle. These include, but are limited to, the need to forge a Chicano identity in view of the marginalization experienced by Chicanos in US, poverty, oppression of diverse populations, inequities in services access, inequality in educational opportunity, immigration, colonia (rural) health and lack of infrastructure, etc.
As an experiential instructional approach, the songs can be utilized to create classroom environments for generating students’ interest examining their cultural and ethnic identity, the legacy of the Chicano Movement in El Valle, and for engaging in community organizing as Chicano activists realized in earlier eras of reform.
The songs are planned for recording of a 10 song CD to distribute to students, conference attendees, and the public.       
Noe Ramirez is an Associate Professor, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. Bachelors, Masters, & Doctorate in Social Work. Work experience in: (1) rural development; (2) social services; (3) mental health; (4) substance abuse counseling, and (5) clinical supervision in psychiatric settings. 20th year as social work educator. I have published on clinical supervision, immigration, acculturation, community organizing, and social work education. His primary interests are in academia (research, publishing and instruction) and providing service to communities. 
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